“Would you mind my drone taking a picture of us? “

Another Internet phenomenon is born: the “Dronie”. People are taking short videos of themselves with drones. Is this new media practice already the evolution of the “Selfie”? And how does it relate to the “Otherie”: the controversial use of drones for military or surveillance purposes? A short sketch of the Dronie’s aesthetics and politics.

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"Would you mind my drone taking a picture of us? "

Another Internet phenomenon is born: the “Dronie”. People are taking short videos of themselves with drones. Is this new media practice already the evolution of the “Selfie”? And how does it relate to the “Otherie”: the controversial use of drones for military or surveillance purposes? A short sketch of the Dronie’s aesthetics and politics.

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Who cares about Selfies? It’s the #Otherie, stupid!
Jun30

Who cares about Selfies? It’s the #Otherie, stupid!

A fieldnote from Tel Aviv, Israel (July 2014):
People take Selfies, but armies and states in war rely on #Otheries: the one-dimensional focus on the Other, as a target, as an object of war. A note on Othering in the current Israeli military operation against Hamas in Gaza.

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Who cares about Selfies? It's the #Otherie, stupid!
Jun30

Who cares about Selfies? It's the #Otherie, stupid!

A fieldnote from Tel Aviv, Israel (July 2014):
People take Selfies, but armies and states in war rely on #Otheries: the one-dimensional focus on the Other, as a target, as an object of war. A note on Othering in the current Israeli military operation against Hamas in Gaza.

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Humans of the Future

A fieldnote from Munich, Germany (October 2013)

…one day humankind will be living in huge, well planned, structured and organised cities, where everyone will have his or her needs fulfilled in this life of 24/7-availability…

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No culture without power

“Practices like female genital mutilation tend to occur in situations where women have been the ones with less power and men have had more power. You may say, well, female genital mutilation is part of their culture – which suggests that they have agreed on this. I have my doubts. Because I frequently think that culture is involved in a power equation. If you change the power equation, are you really going to find all the people – men, women, young, old – still wanting to stick to these customs?”

Ulf Hannerz about anthropology, politics, and culture.

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