Living the reaspora: Afropolitans back home

In the web series ‘An African City’, five highly qualified and fashion obsessed young women decide to return to the continent where their ancestors were born – to Africa. Is this the new African elite?

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One click away?

It has never been easier to meet people from all over the world. Social networks and dating sites make it possible. More and more couples are meeting via the web – and across international boundaries. The seemingly borderless digital world is limited though, by national borders that are insurmountable for many, depending on their nationality. What does this ongoing development mean for people from third countries subject to visa requirements if they have found a partner in Europe?

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What does poverty look like on social media?
Feb05

What does poverty look like on social media?

This blog post is part of a much larger theme of the impact of social media on low income populations. This is most debated among social media theorists and activists and is also one of the research objectives of the Global Social Media Impact Study. I will give just a few insights on this issue from the Italian field site.

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Being cosmopolitans, in the name of Japan!

A fieldnote from Japanese universities (Tokyo, Nagoya, Ibaraki, Fukushima)

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The privilege of staying home

Who has the better deal? The “left-behind wife” or the travelling, bread-winning husband? Reflections about a misconception on gender equality.

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Who actually benefits?

Backpacking in Mexico; volunteering in India; surfing in South Africa; relaxing in Thailand – the current generation is travelling a lot and preferably in regions far away, on the other side of the globe. You can learn languages, gain “intercultural competence“, meet interesting people. Back at home the travellers draw on the experiences they gained and tell their family and friends of the fantastic beaches and the great hospitality. But isn’t it weird to travel around the world while the majority of the global population isn’t able to get neither a flight ticket nor a visa? Doesn’t tourism in the Global South* rather stand for a neocolonial age than for liberty and borderless mobility?

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